My new imaginary pet

My writer friend Kallie George will soon be releasing the first book in her Magical Animal Adoption Series, and she’s just launched a new website. It’s the most adorable thing ever. I took the quiz and it turns out that I’m a suitable host for either winged horses or griffyns. (Maybe they like clean bathrooms and freshly ironed linens?)

maaa

Once again, this website makes me think I should re-examine my writing choices. My friend Rachelle sets her books in Moscow and Prague, then she gets to go on “research” trips.

Where do I set my books? The Kootenays.

Now Kallie gets a magical animal website. What kind of website quiz could I create? Hmmm… a “would you eat maggots to survive” version? It’s not quite the same!

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Housework and hazard pay

1. Housework
We are still all about the ADLs around here. Min needs to test ten volunteers, doing two household tasks each. I’m pretty sure this was a trick to get me to clean the bathroom and iron his shirts. I’ll have you know that I am officially, objectively capable of both those tasks, though I lost points for (a) leaving the rag drawer open and (b) propping the ironing board with my chin while I adjusted my grip.

I would like to write the ADLs people to argue that ironing is in fact NOT a necessary activity of daily life. Unfortunately, I was only asked to take the test, not to write the test.

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2. Hazard Pay
If no one hears from me for the rest of the week, it’s because I’m hanging out with my one-year-old nephew. He is a funny, happy little guy. But holy busy, batman! How in the world did I write when I had toddlers in the house? Apparently, multi-tasking is no longer one of my ADLs. Wish me luck!

Clover’s Luck

My Insklingers writing group compatriot Kallie George has a new book coming out after Christmas, called Clover’s Luck. It’s the first in her Magical Animal Adoption Agency series, published by Disney/Hyperion in the U.S. and by HarperCollins in Canada.

maaa

Kallie was kind enough to give my 10-year-old an advance copy, and here’s my daughter’s review:

I thought this was a really good book. I love Clover and the whole M.A.A.A. I especially liked the part when Clover turns green in the witch’s potion and she realizes she is lucky. My favorite characters are Clover and the dragon. I felt bad for the poor unicorn that lost its tail. If I had a unicorn (and if there was a witch disguised as a princess trying to steal my unicorn’s tail), I would kick that princess/witch off the face of the earth! I’m not such a fan of princesses anyway. It was a really good book, and I’m looking forward to the rest of the series!

I am not such a fan of processes either, but I’m a big fan of Kallie and Clover. I think the entire series is going to be… well… magical.

Reading blitz

I’ve spent the past week as a subject of Montmoray. Well, not really, but I may as well have. I’ve been immersed in a trilogy recommended by fellow Inkslinger Kallie George: A Brief History of Montmoray, The FitzOsbornes in Exile, and The FitzOsbornes at War, by Michelle Cooper.

Now, I am thoroughly wishing two things:
1. That Montmoray could be a real place.
2. That I could write books like this.

As item two is unlikely, I plan to comfort myself by reading the rest of the books recently recommended by my writing group:
Out of My Mind by Sharon Draper
Memoirs of a Teenage Amnesiac by Gabrielle Zevin
Elsewhere by Gabrielle Zevin

To which I added:
The Painted Girls by Cathie Marie Buchanan

If I have thicker glasses next time you see me, you’ll know why!

How to find a writer’s group: the sequel

Today, for some light comic relief, I present the story of how I ignored most of yesterday’s advice, and nonetheless found my writing group.

I went to a writing workshop. This particular workshop was about electronic publishing and on-line presence. But here’s the thing about writing classes of any form: 99 percent of attendees are introverts, and at least half of the remaining one percent are… um, how to say this nicely… wacko. So, you turn up at this exciting class, and you find a whole room of nervous-looking people writing notes (before anyone’s said anything) and trying to look busy, because after years spent in front of their computers, they have no idea how to interact with strangers.

Being one of those people, I got out my notebook and began taking copious notes. I continued to scribble right up until the moment when we were supposed to write down our goals for the coming year. Then I wrote “FIND A WRITING GROUP” in big letters, and left my notebook conveniently open, hoping the writer sitting next to me (Rachelle Delaney, whom I sort of knew from CWILL meetings) might glance my way.

I went home and waited. And waited. And waited a bit more. And lo and behold, she called me and said she and her friend Kallie were starting a writer’s group. Did I want to join?

Well, glory hallelliuah! I did.

I never asked whether she actually saw my secret message.